SCANDINAVIAN-DESIGNED PIECES TO UPGRADE YOUR IKEA FURNITURES

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We all probably have quite a few pieces of IKEA furniture in our homes, some more than others, so how can we customize them to make them unique?

At Norse Interiors, you can find luxurious, custom-made replacement pieces to turn IKEA furniture storage into bespoke works of art. You choose the color and design before fitting them over your existing IKEA sideboards, credenzas and media consoles at home. By retrofitting an IKEA system with Norse pieces means you upcycle durable, inexpensive foundations to create artisan furniture that is stunning, sustainable and just plain smart.

Created by Lotta Lundaas, a Swede who moved to the US, the start-up Norse is the perfect way to upgrade your IKEA furnitures with doors, sides, tops and accessories. She wanted to work with American factories to bring timeless, Scandinavian design to the furniture market at a reasonable price point. The collection consists of seven designs that fit onto IKEA’s Bestå storage frame and television stand. All the different patterns come in seven luxurious colors, and are all named after important women who changed the world and pioneered the way for generations to come such as Eleanor Roosevelt, Astrid Lindgren, Frida Kahlo and Rosa Parks.

Eleanor Roosevelt was an American politician, diplomat, and activist, regarded as “one of the most esteemed women in the world.” She pressed the United States to join and support the United Nations and served as the first chair of the U.N. Commission on Human Rights, overseeing the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Herringbone is having a big moment, and that’s not just limited to floors. The Eleanor brings the timeless, fishtail-inspired pattern from 19th century Paris to your living room.

Marie Curie was a Polish physicist and chemist who was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize. She is the only woman to have won it twice and she was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris. Marie was a pioneer in the field of radioactivity, and she discovered the elements of radium and polonium.

The Marie boasts mid-century modern nostalgia with its parquet pattern. The unique design makes for the perfect statement piece, and the lines pop with an almost 3-D effect.

Amelia Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She set many records in competitive flying and wrote best-selling books about her experiences. Her work was fundamental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots.

Coco Chanel once said, “It is always better to be underdressed.” The Amelia proves that simple doesn’t have to be boring with a clean design that is perfect alone, or with patterned doors.

Eva Perón, often referred to as Evita, was Argentina’s First Lady. Eva campaigned tirelessly for the poor and women’s rights. She founded the Eva Perón Foundation, championed women’s suffrage in Argentina, and founded and ran the nation’s first large-scale female political party, the Female Peronist Party.

Travel back to the Gatsby era with the Eva. The interlacing pattern evokes Jazz Age glamour, while curved lines add softness and femininity to the hard edges of the piece.

Mexican artist Frida Kahlo is remembered as much for her political activism as she is for her vibrant and passionate self-portraits. Frida is celebrated for her depiction of the female experience and form. The painter is regarded as an icon for Chicanos, feminists, the LGBTQ movement and more.

Geometric shapes intersect in the Art Deco-inspired Frida. The elegant pattern forms a sequence with each additional door.

Astrid, who wrote the “Pippi Longstocking” books, is the world’s 18th most translated author and the fourth most-translated children’s writer. Astrid was well-known both for her support for children’s and animal rights and for her opposition to corporal punishment, earning her the Right Livelihood Award. She often wrote about girls as strong, independent, and powerful, empowering many generations of women.

The minimalist Astrid takes cues from architectural tradition with its clean, simple lines. The pattern is a nod to ribbed wood, a much-beloved and timeless texture.

Rosa Parks is called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” thanks to her activism in the Civil Rights Movement. She is also known for refusing to surrender her bus seat to a white passenger, triggering the Montgomery boycott that helped launch nationwide efforts to end segregation.

Less is more in the Rosa. Its sleek, minimalist pattern offers versatility to mix and match with busier pieces in your home. We think it looks great on its own, too.

If you need any more information, head over to Norse’s FAQ site for all the details.

// Photo credit: Norse Interiors

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